9 October 2005

blood and bone

From the comments, it is clear that American people do not know about blood and bone. For gardens, that is.

Blood & Bone is a natural, organic fertiliser, available in bags from supermarkets and gardening shops. When we first moved to this house 10 years ago the soil in our garden was so depleted and powdery dry that every week when I did the supermarket shopping, I would toss a bag of blood & bone, or cow manure (also available at my local supermarket, happily) into the trolley. It became a weekly thing to throw onto the garden and after about two years I had lovely rich dark loam. Except for that dry bit under the paperbark that is doomed to remain dry and powdery and not grow anything except euphorbias.

Don't ask me whose blood and bone is in the bag, as this is a question I do not wish to know the answer to. I suspect it's elderly cows or racehorses. But really, it's best not to dwell. Are you ready with me ...? Stick your fingers in your ears and sing La la la la, La la la la. Loudly.

7 comments:

Anonymous said...

Your Blog. It's nice.

Jamie.

chench said...

I will remember the blood and bone when I'm able to have a garden again. Love the chair!

blackbird said...

silly americans.

Here in Tuvalu, this is clearly pirate-speak for doing evil!

Gina E. said...

My Dad used nothing else on our yards - trees, shrubs, flowers, fruit and veg - the whole lot. And we had the best of everything for miles around! I started using it to try and improve the disgusting clay stuff that our house is built on, but in the first week, I discovered one of our dogs eating it (the B & B) off the ground minutes after I had strewn it around, and as it is supposed to be toxic to them, I just stopped doing it.

tracie said...

just think of it as the cycle of life. I really enjoy reading your blog, I've been meaning to comment for a while.

Alice said...

More than 70 years ago, one of the first jobs my father had after arriving from England was working in a bone mill in Gippsland. He said it was horrendous. The bones came in truckloads from the abbatoirs (scraps of rotting and fly-blown meat still attached) and had to be fed into a huge oven or furnace where they were cooked at very high temperatures. Then he had to put them through the crusher. He said that the smell, noise, heat, dust, and flies in an Australian summer was almost unbearable.

I just love it as a fertilizer. It's so easy to use and even the smell has been improved over the years.

christina said...

Oh I know about blood & bone meal. My mom has always used it on her garden--natural fertilizer. And btw, your garden is BEAUTIFUL.