17 April 2010

small moments

The Alice Project #2
The Alice Project, #2. 7.15 am, Friday 16th April

::

The city centre, yesterday :: I am walking in front of three young German tourists. As we near the Arts Centre, I stop to let an elderly man finish taking a photo of his beautifully dressed partner (they were obviously tourists too, I think Italian from their accents?). The Germans almost collide with me, then see why I've stopped and they wait also. The elderly man, behind his camera, doesn't see that we are there but his wife does. The camera clicks and we continue walking, but the young German boy skips into place next to the elderly Italian woman and adopts a gallant pose beside her. The German girls giggle and scold and the smile stays on my face all the way to my car.

::

At the hairdresser, this morning :: The hairdresser asks me how I would like my tea and I tell her. We are catching up while the tea brews. I haven't seen her for six months; she's been away from her salon having treatment for breast cancer and has only just returned - very part time. She talks of the huge importance of having women friends around her at this time, supporting and nurturing her. I take a sip of my tea and realise she has forgotten the sugar. She's still talking, and I can't bring myself to interrupt. The moment passes. I drink the tea.

::

My car, this evening :: I have four 14 year old boys in my car. I am driving them to a party far far away, listening to them talk about friends, teachers, parents; boasting and bluffing, affectionately giving each other a hard time as teenage boys do. At one point we crest a hill and laid out before us is an enormous low-hanging golden sliver of a new moon. I exclaim and point it out, and one of the boys says Wow, nature is just perfect sometimes. When we arrive at the party, (down a very rough dirt lane off a dirt road in the pitch darkness) and they tumble out of the car before I've even cut the engine, the boy whose voice has been the loudest, whose swagger exceeds the others' combined, turns to me and says with impeccable manners Thank you for driving us Susan. Please drive safely on the way home, it's such a long way. Thanks again! I walk them to the door to hand them over to the host's mum despite my son's embarrassment, and the boy thanks me again politely before disappearing into the bedlam with the others.

::

Some of my regular flock
Feeding my babies, this afternoon

23 comments:

Susan said...

such a great post! I love the story about the teenage boy saying thanks... I only hope one day my little baby will grow up to have such good manners!

rachel said...

Lovely post, Susan. So nice when kids can show that their upbringing has worked - I wonder if his mum sees that courteous side of her boy? Possibly not - I know I valued other people's positive feedback about my grunting teenager!

Isn't your flock increasing! I suspect you are turning into St Francis of Assisi.... Do they all sing at once?

Lynn said...

Thank you for that. I can't think of a better way to start my day...

Ali said...

These moments - they bear recording. Very elegantly written.

Badger said...

Sigh. Lovely.

Tracee said...

Wonderful.

SmitoniusAndSonata said...

They all remain the same nice little boys under all the bravura . Thank heavens!
And your gamely drinking the sugarless tea was another of those kind gestures that makes a day special . Well done .

Nikki said...

Lovely lovely lovely

Made me grin... a lot!
xo

Frogdancer said...

Loved that last anecdote. I don't know why so many people are scared of teenagers.

Angel Jem said...

Did you ever watch Harry Enfield and chums with his teenager Kevin? His mate Perry was exactly like that, all bluster until he had to speak to a Mum and then he was all politeness. Loved your post today.

Karen said...

Life is good! What a fun post!

alice c said...

I miss having teenage boys around. I adore the energy and inventive humour...and the courtesy that I always find absolutely charming in young lads half way between childhood and adulthood.

Isabelle said...

What a lovely post. It inspired various thoughts. I love blogs!

Lozzy said...

Such a lovely post and it is so ture the little things mean the most sometimes.

librarygirl said...

You are brave! Upwey - dirt road - dark - unfamiliar. Well done you.

Donyale said...

Last night my daughter couldn't sleep so she crept into my bed (and ousted my husband in the process)...we lay there together, holding hands and chatting. A tear or two slipped out as I thought how fleeting this time will be....when she becomes a teenager and won't want to do that.

And then I read your story and my heart did a little flutter. I hope, that even if/when she doesn't want to hold my hand to go to sleep that she will remember her manners when another Mother does something nice for her.

Tania said...

Oh you do, do the random, the ordinary, the every day, the small hidden gemlet, oh, so well.

Stacey said...

What a gorgeous post Suse. That boy with the manners? How divine. I dream of my kids speaking like that.

victoria said...

I love "please drive safely..."

Meggie said...

How kind of you, to share these lovely golden moments with us.

Di said...

Great moments well appreciated. You have quite a little flock there!

Sharon said...

What a beautiful and reflective post.. Thank you...

LemonyRenee' said...

Fun and inspiring post. Great idea for the form of a post.