29 May 2010

one of those messy posts about lots of things

The lime glut continues.

the lime glut continues

I made a batch of dark, treacly lime marmalade, much darker than the picture in the recipe book. Note to self: ignore the bit in the recipe that tells you to wait until the mixture thickly coats the back of a wooden spoon before you do the saucer-in-the-freezer gel test. By then it's too late and will set rock hard.

And yet more lime butter/curd.

Tomorrow night we're having chicken with a lime and honey glaze. The bounty, it never ends.

Also I am knitting two blue shawls, how's that for clever?

I cast on a Damson last weekend in a kind of mini KAL with Kate,

a blue damson
(if you click on that photo you will find out what we ate for breakfast)

but left it at work on Thursday and realised I wouldn't be back in the office until next Tuesday. Gah! Of course I couldn't possibly just work on my other unfinished knitting projects, no! So I cast on this ...

age of brass and steam

to see me through the weekend. As you do. It's the Age of Brass and Steam Kerchief and I am thoroughly enjoying it. I'm using the leftover silk-wool tweed that I used for my French cardi and I intend to use every scrap of this most delicious blue silk blend yarn.

In other news I finished Wolf Hall and am desperately missing my nightly before-bed dose of Thomas Cromwell. I started Vikram Seth's A Suitable Boy last night and am suffering culture shock. Might need to wait a few days before I can pick it up again.

--------------------------------------------

Can I just say thanks to everyone who's commented over the past few months and left lovely compliments about my shawls, made suggestions for the 'lie' I had to tell (the fruit carving championship was only one brilliant suggestion among many) or just dropped in to say hi. I love seeing comments come in from both familiar and new names, even though in many cases Blogger won't let me reply or click through to a blog or profile. I enjoy seeing a name pop up that I remember from a past comment - Jo who always comments when I mention the Tweed Valley or northern NSW (are you the same Jo who now lives in NZ and sent me a Celia tea towel recently?) and Tish whose name always gives me a jolt when I see it because my godmother's name is Tish and surely there can't be very many Tish's in the world (are you a woman in her mid 70s who lives in Los Angeles?). Anyway, thank you all for reading, commenting, making me laugh, joining in the conversation. Please keep saying hello - it makes my day.

My blog will be five years old next month and I have a little treat planned as a thank you.

27 comments:

Gina said...

How wonderful to have a glut of limes... courgettes don't quite have the same ring to them!

librarygirl said...

Wolf Hall - I know that feeling!
Poor Cremuel, I miss him so much.

Tish said...

Nope- only 50 and live a bit further east in Colorado Springs with a view of snow-capped Pike's Peak out my front door. :) I was surprised to find that I am one of 25 or so Tish's on Ravelry since I have only met 5 other Tish's in person.

louise said...

Hi Suse...I was the queen of toffeed jam..waiting for the jam to wrinkle on the plate. But now I just watch the glugs in the jam as it cooks, and I can judge by that.Suddenly the glugs change into vlcanic glugs, and that means it's ready to come off the heat...it took me years to realise it still cooks in the jar. Runny is a whole lot better than rock-like.

peskypixies said...

I love all your shawls and scarves.
it inspires me no end.

Must get going on shawl after I finish Tiny Tea Laves and pressie for new baby(not mine) and name banner for other new baby(also not mine!!)

Kate said...

What is the freezer gel test? I do the bit of marmalade on the saucer, run the back of a spoon through the middle. If the little path stays for a second before the marmalade runs back to the centre, it's done.

I've ALSO been eyeing off the age of brass and steam. Maybe that's next :P After I *#$ finish cinnabar. *&#@ plackets!

gingerknitting said...

Oh! Big pang as I note that missing Thomas Cromwell is exactly the ailment I'm suffering (no novels till after the exam). The video of the Other Boleyn Girl helped a little.

But you wait, A Suitable Boy will do it as well. It was the first time I experienced the soap opera effect of a book - and not just 'cause its so long!

Lynda said...

Suse - Hullo! I have long admired your blog, although I became hooked (!) when I saw the crocheted shawl you purchased at a market a few years ago. Your knitting makes me sigh with envy, your writing is so beautifully vivid, and I thank you for sharing so many wonderful stories and images. I also think I might come from the same part of the world as you - I'm down in the Gully, however, foothills rather than up in the hills.

jo said...

Limes are my most favourite flavour I think - makes me think of Mexico, fresh salsa, and a laksa I used to make back in my youth. There's something about the smell of a lime that seems to go straight to the Proustian bit of my brain...
I suspect I am the Jo who comments about Northern NSW, because I grew up in the valley and there's something lovely about someone else seeing and speaking of your home town. I read often, am rather slack about commenting on more than the odd occasion (as you have observed), but I'm Sydney based not NZ. Your moss green silk shawl btw, is a stunner - and has me itching to make one in the same colour...

Sarah said...

Just wanted to let you know that yours is one of the blogs I check in on, and I really enjoy reading about the knitting, family, books, photography etc. Can't see myself in the shawls but am fascinated that they are so addictive! Am co-owner of 6 alpacas and we are waiting for our first lot of spun fleece to be ready, think it will have to all be turned into scarves as am not much of a knitter. Also laughed out loud about the Steiner car pool and told my hairdresser who's Steiner son loves (and leaves behind) his knitting. Sorry, is this too long for a comment?? Love the sewing and craft camp tales to. All very inspiring and might even start my own blog, thank you.

Sarah said...

I have had the "rock" experience, but with maple sugaring. I'm hoping to make some strawberry-rhubarb jam this weekend after I finish recovering from Lou's pentathlon.

Laura Jane said...

Ah, yes, the 'is the jam done' conversation. My husband managed to make plum rock earlier this year, and it is so sweet and - lets be honest BURNT- that I felt unable to share any. So we are stuck with 2 salsa jars of very dark and toffee-like plum jam, which does loosen with hot water (30%) to become a usable consistency. I swirl it through cake batter like a tea cake, and have also used it with a splash of white vinegar as a plum sauce marinade.

Tan said...

I so admire your ability to keep this amazing blog going - I have commitment issues with my own... Once again loving and empathising with the Steiner comments - so lovely to hear :-)
I am also wondering what the Addis Turbo needles are? What makes them so fast?
Thanks again
Tanya
PS Made your soup again the other day with added leeks and spinach and little pieces of pork sausage fried up and served on top - YUMMO :-)

Badger said...

Hello! Howdy! Hola! Guten Tag! And that pretty much exhausts my repertoire.

katiecrackernuts said...

The bounty of lemony dishes is about to start in my house. The tree's coming along just fine and we always get a good haul.
Now, five years you say. What made you start a blog way bay in 2005?

Tania said...

Just for the record, your ‘messy' posts are often the ones I like best. I prefer to think of them as (lots of little bits) minestrone soup posts...

victoria said...

Between you and Library Girl talking about Wolf Hall I'm going to go find it in the library system. Lime butter sounds wonderful.
I love the Batwing shawl, I'd hang it on the wall.

appletreedream said...

Lime butter sounds fantastic. I wonder how it tastes like.

BabelBabe said...

hmmm. have been contemplating the turbos ever since a friend let me knit some of her baby hat on them...I do love my bamboo, but the Turbos are so slick and clickety : )

alice c said...

I wandered around aimlessly for months after finishing Wolf Hall. Everything seemed quite pallid in comparision.

Am loving the whole shawl explosion that you have going on at the moment.

Fairlie said...

The first time I ever made marmalade, I followed those "coating the back of a wooden spoon" instructions to the letter. I think I boiled the marmalade for about five hours...

Yes, it was a most firm batch.

Lynda said...

Hullo Suse - yes, I delurked!

Yes - the crocheted granny square shawl...got me in, achievable for me, but your lace knitted masterpieces are well beyond my abilities, so I simply sigh with deep appreciation of your creations.

They are truly beautiful.

Karen said...

Love lime or lemon curd. Boy, that looks good! And I love your Age of Brass and Steam Kerchief. I looked it up on Ravelry--had never seen it before. Now it's marked on my ever-increasing list of favorite to-do's. Thanks! XX

Thimbleanna said...

Your lime curd looks wonderful. As does your knitting -- you knit so beautifully! And Wolf Hall. Sigh. It's next on my list but I just haven't been able to squeeze in much reading time in the last few months. I've been stuck on Olive Kitteridge for months now -- must get on with it!

Flower said...

My mouth is watering! I've just made Lemon Marmalade and it hasn't set up real hard...by some kind of luck!! Lime marmalade would be a real treat..hmmmm. Want to trade recipes?

flowerpress said...

I have a great cake recipe that uses lemon (lime) curd. Give me a yell if you'd like it.
And A Suitable Boy, exhaustingly long, but one of those books that stay in your thoughts and a great crash course on Indian history and culture. I really loved it!

Duyvken said...

The curd looks delish.
And tell me more about the name Tish. Is it short for something?
Blogging's a funny thing, isn't it? I so enjoyed this post and reading all the comments.