14 November 2013

14th november

Gingko

I have a thing about gingko trees (see leaf, above). Did you know the gingko tree is a living fossil? They were on the earth at the time of the dinosaurs. Later, monks planted them around temples in Japan and China. This leaf comes from one of the three gingkos growing just south of the Baillieu Library at Melbourne uni, just near the entrance to the medical library. I used to always detour when walking through the campus to ensure i passed them. I have just been informed that other notable gingko specimens frame the entrance to the Old Geology building also at Melbourne Uni (must return), another is in the Geelong botanic Gardens, and a 200 year old specimen is in Kew Gardens in London (also, must return).

Gingko trees make me feel calm and inspired.

5 comments:

Gordon Cheng said...

There is more to the wonderful gingko story. It was actually thought to be extinct , and to have been for hundreds of years, when it was found growing near a temple in China. I' m pretty sure that the one at Kew was grown from the newly discovered Chinese one. Melbourne uni has some great trees and other plants. When I did landscape architecture at RMIT we used to go to MU for our plant ID classes.

Jan said...

We had land at Wollombi out of Cessnock for some years. Lots of ginkos growing there. I loved the shape of the leaves. This was not far as the crow flies from where the Wollemi pine was discovered still growing. I used to wonder just what other ancient wonders may have been hidden in the narrow deep valleys.

Amy at love made my home said...

They are such unusual shaped leaves aren't they!

shadygrey said...

Yes, I agree, Gingkos are special. Such a lovely leaf shape too. You need to get one of Rudi's gingko leaf mandalas! Come to the art show next year, I thinking he's putting some in.

Monika said...

I also heard that Gingkos where the only trees that survived Hiroshima. And they are a fusion between deciduous and pine trees, because the lines in the leaves are actually fused needles.